Slow cured, the old-fashioned way

Slow cured, the old-fashioned way

Slow cured, the old-fashioned way

Once the salame has been stuffed into its natural casing, the real fun of salame making really begins.

The salame is tied on each end, hung on “trees” and wheeled to the culture room where it starts the fermentation process.

After about 72 hours, the salame is moved to a drying room where we carefully control the air to keep humidity low and temperature cool. This lets the moisture in the meat rise to the surface, giving the casing its trademark white bloom, which helps “lock in” the old-world flavor and moistness.

The drying room is where much of the art of salame making takes place. Curemasters who’ve been making salame for decades keep vigilant watch over each chub for about three weeks. We never, ever rush the process, always waiting until we can almost hear the salame say, “I’m delicious now—I’m ready to go.”